FAQ Horse Shipping Tips

1. How do I pay for the trip?
2. How do I determine which office to call when shipping a horse?
3. What about coggins and health certificates?
4. How should I determine if my horse(s) should ship in a single, stall & 1/2 or box stall?
5. How much notice do you need to book a trip?
6. On a carrier's convenience ship, how will I know when the horse is scheduled to ship?
7. Do you go point to point or make frequent stops between pick-up and drop off?
8. Should I wrap or bandage my horses legs?
9. If there will be no one at the drop off point, will the driver put the horse in the stall?
10. Should I blanket my horse?
11. What is carrier's convenience?
12. Do you use more than one driver on long hauls?
13. What type of insurance do you have for the horse or is insurance available?
14. Do you have attendants?
15. What about hay and water en route?



1.  How do I pay for the trip?

We take all major credit cards, checks, money orders, money wires, and cash.

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2. How do I determine which office to call when shipping a horse?

For Lexington local shipping - call our Lexington office, for shipping within Florida, call our Ocala office. We would prefer that for over the road ships you call our main office in Oley, Pennsylvania.

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3.  What about coggins and health certificates?

Requirements vary from state to state. When you book your shipment our dispatcher will advise you on what paperwork we will need to get you shipped.  Most Coggins are good for a year, but some states require within 6 months (such as the state of California). If you only have a copy of your coggins, it needs to be notarized; copies of Health Certificates are okay and are good for 30 days. www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_import/animal_imports_states.shtml has the most up-to-date information on health requirements by state. Most states do suggest you contact them for any more recent updates.

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4. How should I determine if my horse(s) should ship in a single stall, stall & 1/2 or box stall?

Single stalls, stall and a half-half-the width of the van, and box stall-entire width of van, not cross-tied

A number of factors go into the decision of what size stall to ship in. The most common accommodation is the stall & 1/2. Traditionally, average sized horses of any breed or gender can ship comfortably in that configuration. Smaller horses can and do ship in the single stall on some occasions. Certain situations, however, are not open to conjecture. Pregnant mares, mares with nursing foals, unbroken weanlings, stallions and fractious or high strung horses all need to ship in box stalls. Horses shipped in box stalls arrive fresher and are less inclined to have any health issues related to shipping. Please refer to our FYI page for additional information about the advantages of box stalls.

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5.  How much notice do you need to book a trip?
That depends on a number of factors such as the time of year, where you are going and how many horses. Generally speaking a 7 day window is what we like to work with.

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6. On a carrier's convenience ship, how will I know when the horse is scheduled to ship?

We will call you one or two days in advance. The person who books the horse(s) to ship gives a contact for the pickup and destination point whom we will contact regarding approximate pickup/arrivals.  The contact persons listed are who our dispatch is going to call to find out if your horse is ready to travel, get directions to the farm and give a pick-up/drop-off time to. If you make yourself the pick-up and/or drop-off contact it will be your responsibility to make sure the person who is actually at the farm knows the time(s) our staff gives. Please listen to messages, return all calls to Brook Ledge and get the name of the caller. Dispatch calls/sets up the vans 24-36 hours in advance.  Please make sure your horse is ready during the time frame you give. Dispatch will need to reach a contact or get a return call before they will formally plan your horse on the load.

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7. Do you go point to point or make frequent stops between pick-up and drop off?

All trips are expedited. Carriers convenience are generally mixed loads with various pick-up points. Invariably that means several drop-off points as well.

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8. Should I wrap or bandage my horses legs?

We discourage the wrapping of legs. On long hauls the wraps can slide and cause your horse more problems than they are worth. Our drivers will unwrap but will not attempt to reset your wraps. We are happy to answer and explain further concerns over the phone.

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9.  If there will be no one at the drop off point, will the driver put the horse in the stall?

Someone should be there to receive the horse.

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10.  Should I blanket my horse?

Even if your horse is going from Florida to New York or vice versa, we do not recommend blanketing your horse. Our drivers can regulate the temperature in the truck with ease by opening or closing windows. Horses can tolerate the cold much easier than they can the heat. 

According to article "Road Tests: How Shipping Affects Horses" by Christine Barakat as featured in the April 2000 EQUUS magazine, "Unless you are shipping in the coldest, wettest climates in an open stock trailer, the risk of horses getting too cold is minimal compared to the risks associated with stagnant air, accumulating exhaust fumes and excessive heat."

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11.  What is carrier's convenience?

Essentially it means we will try to take your horse if and when we can consolidate a van to that destination. Our dispatchers will assist you in evaluating the frequency and timeframes of possible shipments. Even with Carriers convenience shipments, we can still go when you want to go 95% of the time.

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12.  Do you use more than one driver on long hauls?

Yes, we always use two licensed, quality drivers on each truck.

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13.  What type of insurance do you have for the horse or is insurance available?

$2,000 Mortality Insurance is covered on each horse. If you would like additional insurance or travel insurance for your horse, contact your existing insurance agent or we can provide you with a telephone number for a broker.

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14.  Do you have attendants?

No, we have closed circuit cameras on all trucks. Attendants can be made available to you on your advanced request at an additional charge.

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15.  What about hay and water en route?

Hay and water are provided throughout your horse's trip. You provide hay for your horse’s trip, most horses prefer the hay to which they are accustomed.  Ask our staff how much you should send for your horses trip if you are unsure.



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